How to Get a Medical Marijuana Card in Connecticut

Illustrated map of Connecticut, USA. Travel and attractions

In 2012, Connecticut Governor Dannel Molloy signed the Marijuana Palliative Use Act, legalizing the use of marijuana for medical purposes in the state. Connecticut first voted to legalize recreational cannabis in 2018, and it is officially legal as of July 1, 2021. Retail sales of cannabis aim to begin in Connecticut by the end of 2022. 

Until then, you must have a medical marijuana card to purchase cannabis in Connecticut. If you’re interested in getting a medical marijuana card, here’s what you need to know to apply.

Quick Guide to Connecticut MMJ

There are three basic steps to getting a medical marijuana card in Connecticut.

  • Determine Your Eligibility: To be eligible, you must be diagnosed with a medical condition that will benefit from medical marijuana treatment.

How to Get a Connecticut Medical Cannabis Card in Three Steps

Determine Your Eligibility

Parkinson’s Disease

Connecticut’s medical marijuana began in 2012 with only 10 approved conditions. The list of qualifying conditions grew substantially over the years, however. Other basic requirements include that you are a Connecticut resident with valid proof of residency (current Driver’s License or State ID card), and are over the age of 18. Underage patients can receive a medical marijuana card by having a caregiver over 18 submit an additional application. Patients also must not be an inmate under the supervision of the Connecticut Department of Corrections.

The list of qualifying conditions in Connecticut began in 2012 with:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • Positive Status for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Damage to the Nervous Tissue of the Spinal Cord with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity
  • Epilepsy
  • Cachexia
  • Wasting Syndrome 
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Conditions added in 2016: 

  • Sickle Cell Disease
  • Post Laminectomy Syndrome with Chronic Radiculopathy
  • Severe Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Type I and Type II
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity
  • Terminal Illness Requiring End-Of-Life Care
  • Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder

Conditions added in 2018: 

  • Spasticity or Neuropathic Pain Associated with Fibromyalgia
  • Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Post Herpetic Neuralgia
  • Hydrocephalus with Intractable Headache
  • Intractable Headache Syndromes
  • Neuropathic Facial Pain
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Osteogenesis Imperfecta 
  • Chronic Neuropathic Pain Associated with Degenerative Spinal Disorders

Conditions added in 2019:

  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • MALS Syndrome (Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome)
  • Vulvodynia and Vulvar Burning
  • Intractable Neuropathic Pain that Is Unresponsive to Standard Medical Treatments
  • Tourette Syndrome

Lastly, in 2020 and 2021 the following conditions were added: 

  • Chronic Pain of at least 6 months duration associated with a specified underlying chronic condition refractory to other treatment intervention
  • Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Associated with Chronic Pain
  • Chronic Pancreatitis
  • Movement disorders associated with Huntington Disease

Get a Medical Marijuana Certification

state-certified doctor

If you’re a resident of Connecticut with a condition or symptoms that qualify you for treatment with medical marijuana, your next step is to get a certification from a state-certified doctor.

If your doctor believes that medical marijuana is an appropriate treatment option for you, they will submit certification for you to the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection. You can sign up with Heally to book an online appointment with a marijuana doctor in your state.

For your appointment, come prepared with a valid photo ID and some form of proof of your medical condition. This could include medical records, office visit summaries, or a note from your healthcare professional.

Complete the Application

Once you have certification from a medical marijuana doctor, you can create an account with the state’s Department of Administrative Services to complete your application. You will then need to submit a copy of a valid photo ID that matches your application, proof of residency, and an application payment of $100.

If your medical marijuana application is approved, getting a card takes around 30 days. Patients will receive a temporary certificate through an email from the DOCP that can be used to purchase cannabis from certified Connecticut dispensaries.

Medical marijuana cards in Connecticut require recertification every year. You can begin the recertification process within 30 days of your card’s expiration date. This requires your physician to approve that he or she is still in charge of taking care of you and to demonstrate a “bonafide” relationship. Patients must submit another registration form, update any changes in personal information as needed, and confirm their Connecticut residency is still valid.

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